Organ Donation - Are you IN??

#1
I find it fascinating that we have a relatively low organ donation percentage in the United States compared to the many countries in the world - the predominate reason is the DMV form.

In countries where you need to opt out of organ donations the percentage is very high in comparison to the United States where generally it is an Opt IN process forcing you to check the box to donate organs.

Should the US encourage states to adopt an Opt Out strategy to promote organ donation??
Should states pursue an Opt Out strategy??
 

lesscrazy

Bronze Member
#4
Yes. I've instructed my family to distribute my bod as needed. After the good stuff is used up the rest can go to the FBI Body Farm or to the bottom of Lake Texoma. I don't care at that point. I think it would be great if all usable cadaver parts were made available. If you want your healthy kidneys or whatever healthy body parts to be buried to rot instead of prolonging a life you should have to say so. If you want to give life before you croak, donating blood or platelets is easy. I'm just a few donations away from 11 gallons donated with zero complications.
 
#5
No. It is such a personal decision that you make that it should require you to opt in and purposefully indicate your desire to be an organ donor. The only reason to make it opt out is to hope people forget to do so and that is not right. I have always been an organ donor but the process should leave all the control with individual to say yes I want to be a donor.
 
#6
This got me thinking. Currently as wife and I are English and grew up in UK during the 80's we are prohibited from giving blood due to mad cow disease. However I'm sure we have selected yes to organ donations. Maybe we have to select no.
I have read there is no test for CJD anyway, so could there be a hidden danger.
This rule applies to US citizens too if they spent more than three months in UK between 1980 - 86.
 

Rimrock

Double Platinum
#7
Yes, here but I wonder about what Dazzor noted. I think that rule applies to those in western Europe during that time period too. Am I right about that?
 

GoodAg

Double Platinum
#8
No. It is such a personal decision that you make that it should require you to opt in and purposefully indicate your desire to be an organ donor. The only reason to make it opt out is to hope people forget to do so and that is not right. I have always been an organ donor but the process should leave all the control with individual to say yes I want to be a donor.
This '93 Aggie agrees with TexasLonghorn94. I'm an organ donor, too, but ultimately people should be able to make that decision for themselves.
 
#9
No. It is such a personal decision that you make that it should require you to opt in and purposefully indicate your desire to be an organ donor. The only reason to make it opt out is to hope people forget to do so and that is not right. I have always been an organ donor but the process should leave all the control with individual to say yes I want to be a donor.

This is a bit of behavioral economics but the power of the default value in decision making significantly affects participation rates. By defaulting to Yes the participation rate goes up tremendously. People would still be able to opt out in the same way they can opt in today.

Texas has one of the LOWEST organ donor rates in the nation.

Yes, I am an organ donor. I'm on the waitlist for a new waistline and metabolism gene - if that ever becomes available.