FISD choosing sides in the city and school board election

#21
The Eismann sits empty 2/3 of the time... guess all the schools are competing for that empty space.

The taxpayers will pay for the arts center THREE times. 1) build it 2) the schools will have to pay for its use 3) to attend events.

The schools don't have to rent space at PHP (at least I don't think so) or the stadiums each school has now. Parents only have to pay TWICE for the privilege of warming a seat to watch kids play :)
 
#23
Was this sent during school time and on school email? If on personal time and personal email. I and COMPLETELY fine with this. Teachers need to have a voice. But as a independent resource.

I know that the school district encourages teachers to contact the state regarding funding, but as individuals, not from there school emails.

He should not be in trouble IMHO.

Ciao for now
It's not a matter of when he did it, it's if he sent it to email addresses that are owned by the school. If he sent it from his personal email to addresses he acquired through FISD, it's called spam.
 

bizguy

Diamond Member
#24
I know Dr. Trent personally and while this may not have been the best idea given his position I know how passionate he is about the arts and in particular the young students which are influenced by the arts through the programs offered at all of the FISD schools. I would bet top dollar that this email was sent out only with the interests of the students for which he is responsible for at heart.

By all means let's fire one of the most caring and compassionate educators that FISD has even had over this issue. Untie your bunched panties bizguy.

ETA: Just wanted to add how completely ignorant your comment about eliminating the Director of Fine Arts for the ISD is. This would but FISD at a disadvantage in attracting the best and brightest teaching talent for the fine arts to the ISD as EVERY OTHER ISD IN TX has a similar administration position. They are VERY important.
I am sure he is a nice person. Doesn't change the fact that what he did lacks integrity.

School is for education - not for fine arts or sports. The district has no business spending tax money on either. If you want your kid in athletics or band, then pay for it yourself and stop using school time for it.

ETA - I don't give a rat's patootie about attracting the best and the brightest teaching talent for the fine arts (or for coaches either for that matter.)
 

Rebel

Diamond Member
#26
Was this sent during school time and on school email? If on personal time and personal email. I and COMPLETELY fine with this. Teachers need to have a voice. But as a independent resource.

I know that the school district encourages teachers to contact the state regarding funding, but as individuals, not from there school emails.

He should not be in trouble IMHO.

Ciao for now
Sent from his ISD email, on ISD time, to an ISD teacher, who forwarded it to her parent contacts.
 

TPW

Diamond Member
#27
I am sure he is a nice person. Doesn't change the fact that what he did lacks integrity.

School is for education - not for fine arts or sports. The district has no business spending tax money on either. If you want your kid in athletics or band, then pay for it yourself and stop using school time for it.

ETA - I don't give a rat's patootie about attracting the best and the brightest teaching talent for the fine arts (or for coaches either for that matter.)
Then you are a complete moron. Arts education and sports are vital parts of a well rounded student. So no humanities in school? No literature? Only grammer, math and science? Look to other countries and how highly they place the arts in education and you will see. Countries that have passed the US in education.
 

TPW

Diamond Member
#28
Since the ISD board encouraged the PTA president's to send letters to their congressman concerning the school budget issue and encouraged them to reach out to the membership to do likewise I don't see this as too big of an issue.
 

bizguy

Diamond Member
#29
Then you are a complete moron. Arts education and sports are vital parts of a well rounded student. So no humanities in school? No literature? Only grammer, math and science? Look to other countries and how highly they place the arts in education and you will see. Countries that have passed the US in education.
The first part of your argument is typical liberal arts graduate drivel... It is not the schools place to create "well rounded" Well rounded would mean that their would be some aspect of spiritualism in the schools. It is the school's function to educate - nothing more.

The second part of argument shows your lack of understanding the problem facing education in this country ane while I am not sure of a lot of things, but I am pretty sure that low scores on the SAT are not a reflection that we do not have enough music or athletics in our schools.

You going to have to try harder...
 

TPW

Diamond Member
#30
Make sure to take note of the part about higher test scores particularly on the SAT...you want facts here you go, cited even.

http://www.nammfoundation.org/research/research-briefs-did-you-know

Did You Know?

Middle school and high school students who participated in instrumental music scored significantly higher than their non-band peers in standardized tests. University studies conducted in Georgia and Texas found significant correlations between the number of years of instrumental music instruction and academic achievement in math, science and language arts.

Source: University of Sarasota Study, Jeffrey Lynn Kluball; East Texas State University Study, Daryl Erick Trent

Did You Know?

Students who were exposed to the music-based lessons scored a full 100 percent higher on fractions tests than those who learned in the conventional manner. Second-grade and third-grade students were taught fractions in an untraditional manner ‹ by teaching them basic music rhythm notation. The group was taught about the relationships between eighth, quarter, half and whole notes. Their peers received traditional fraction instruction.

Source: Neurological Research, March 15, 1999

Did You Know?

Music majors are the most likely group of college grads to be admitted to medical school. Physician and biologist Lewis Thomas studied the undergraduate majors of medical school applicants. He found that 66 percent of music majors who applied to med school were admitted, the highest percentage of any group. For comparison, (44 percent) of biochemistry majors were admitted. Also, a study of 7,500 university students revealed that music majors scored the highest reading scores among all majors including English, biology, chemistry and math.

Sources: "The Comparative Academic Abilities of Students in Education and in Other Areas of a Multi-focus University," Peter H. Wood, ERIC Document No. ED327480

"The Case for Music in the Schools," Phi Delta Kappan, February, 1994

Did You Know?

Music study can help kids understand advanced music concepts. A grasp of proportional math and fractions is a prerequisite to math at higher levels, and children who do not master these areas cannot understand more advanced math critical to high-tech fields. Music involves ratios, fractions, proportions and thinking in space and time. Second-grade students were given four months of piano keyboard training, as well as time using newly designed math software. The group scored over 27 percent higher on proportional math and fractions tests than children who used only the math software.

Source: Neurological Research March, 1999

Did You Know?

A McGill University study found that pattern recognition and mental representation scores improved significantly for students given piano instruction over a three-year period. They also found that self-esteem and musical skills measures improved for the students given piano instruction.

Source: Dr. Eugenia Costa-Giomi, "The McGill Piano Project: Effects of three years of piano instruction on children's cognitive abilities, academic achievement, and self-esteem," presented at the meeting of the Music Educators National Conference, Phoenix, AZ, April, 1998

Did You Know?

Data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988 showed that music participants received more academic honors and awards than non-music students, and that the percentage of music participants receiving As, As/Bs, and Bs was higher than the percentage of non-participants receiving those grades.

Source: National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988 First Follow-Up (1990), U.S. Department of Education.

Did You Know?

Research shows that piano students are better equipped to comprehend mathematical and scientific concepts. A group of preschoolers received private piano keyboard lessons and singing lessons. A second group received private computer lessons. Those children who received piano/keyboard training performed 34 percent higher on tests measuring spatial-temporal ability than the others ‹ even those who received computer training. "Spatial-temporal" is basically proportional reasoning - ratios, fractions, proportions and thinking in space and time. This concept has long been considered a major obstacle in the teaching of elementary math and science.

Source: Neurological Research February 28, 1997

Did You Know?

Young children with developed rhythm skills perform better academically in early school years. Findings of a recent study showed that there was a significant difference in the academic achievement levels of students classified according to rhythmic competency. Students who were achieving at academic expectation scored high on all rhythmic tasks, while many of those who scored lower on the rhythmic test achieved below academic expectation.

Source: "The Relationship between Rhythmic Competency and Academic Performance in First Grade Children," University of Central Florida, Debby Mitchell

Did You Know?

High school music students score higher on SATs in both verbal and math than their peers. In 2001, SAT takers with coursework/experience in music performance scored 57 points higher on the verbal portion of the test and 41 points higher on the math portion than students with no coursework/experience in the arts.

Source: Profile of SAT and Achievement Test Takers, The College Board, compiled by Music Educators National Conference, 2001.

Did You Know?

College-age musicians are emotionally healthier than their non-musician counterparts. A study conducted at the University of Texas looked at 362 students who were in their first semester of college. They were given three tests, measuring performance anxiety, emotional concerns and alcohol related problems. In addition to having fewer battles with the bottle, researchers also noted that the college-aged music students seemed to have surer footing when facing tests.

Source: Houston Chronicle, January 11, 1998

Did You Know?

A ten-year study, tracking more than 25,000 students, shows that music-making improves test scores. Regardless of socioeconomic background, music-making students get higher marks in standardized tests than those who had no music involvement. The test scores studied were not only standardized tests, such as the SAT, but also in reading proficiency exams.

Source: Dr. James Catterall, UCLA, 1997

Did You Know?

The world's top academic countries place a high value on music education. Hungary, Netherlands and Japan stand atop worldwide science achievement and have strong commitment to music education. All three countries have required music training at the elementary and middle school levels, both instrumental and vocal, for several decades. The centrality of music education to learning in the top-ranked countries seems to contradict the United States' focus on math, science, vocabulary, and technology.

Source: 1988 International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IAEEA) Test

Did You Know?

Music training helps under-achievers. In Rhode Island, researchers studied eight public school first grade classes. Half of the classes became "test arts" groups, receiving ongoing music and visual arts training. In kindergarten, this group had lagged behind in scholastic performance. After seven months, the students were given a standardized test. The "test arts" group had caught up to their fellow students in reading and surpassed their classmates in math by 22 percent. In the second year of the project, the arts students widened this margin even further. Students were also evaluated on attitude and behavior. Classroom teachers noted improvement in these areas also.

Source: Nature May 23, 1996

Did You Know?

"Music education can be a positive force on all aspects of a child's life, particularly on their academic success. The study of music by children has been linked to higher scores on the SAT and other learning aptitude tests, and has proven to be an invaluable tool in classrooms across the country. Given the impact music can have on our children's education, we should support every effort to bring music into their classrooms."

Source: U.S. Senator Jeff Bingaman (NM)

Did You Know?

"The nation's top business executives agree that arts education programs can help repair weaknesses in American education and better prepare workers for the 21st century."

Source: "The Changing Workplace is Changing Our View of Education," Business Week, October 1996.
 
#31
Make sure to take note of the part about higher test scores particularly on the SAT...you want facts here you go, cited even.

http://www.nammfoundation.org/research/research-briefs-did-you-know

Did You Know?

Middle school and high school students who participated in instrumental music scored significantly higher than their non-band peers in standardized tests. University studies conducted in Georgia and Texas found significant correlations between the number of years of instrumental music instruction and academic achievement in math, science and language arts.

Source: University of Sarasota Study, Jeffrey Lynn Kluball; East Texas State University Study, Daryl Erick Trent

Did You Know?

Students who were exposed to the music-based lessons scored a full 100 percent higher on fractions tests than those who learned in the conventional manner. Second-grade and third-grade students were taught fractions in an untraditional manner ‹ by teaching them basic music rhythm notation. The group was taught about the relationships between eighth, quarter, half and whole notes. Their peers received traditional fraction instruction.

Source: Neurological Research, March 15, 1999

Did You Know?

Music majors are the most likely group of college grads to be admitted to medical school. Physician and biologist Lewis Thomas studied the undergraduate majors of medical school applicants. He found that 66 percent of music majors who applied to med school were admitted, the highest percentage of any group. For comparison, (44 percent) of biochemistry majors were admitted. Also, a study of 7,500 university students revealed that music majors scored the highest reading scores among all majors including English, biology, chemistry and math.

Sources: "The Comparative Academic Abilities of Students in Education and in Other Areas of a Multi-focus University," Peter H. Wood, ERIC Document No. ED327480

"The Case for Music in the Schools," Phi Delta Kappan, February, 1994

Did You Know?

Music study can help kids understand advanced music concepts. A grasp of proportional math and fractions is a prerequisite to math at higher levels, and children who do not master these areas cannot understand more advanced math critical to high-tech fields. Music involves ratios, fractions, proportions and thinking in space and time. Second-grade students were given four months of piano keyboard training, as well as time using newly designed math software. The group scored over 27 percent higher on proportional math and fractions tests than children who used only the math software.

Source: Neurological Research March, 1999

Did You Know?

A McGill University study found that pattern recognition and mental representation scores improved significantly for students given piano instruction over a three-year period. They also found that self-esteem and musical skills measures improved for the students given piano instruction.

Source: Dr. Eugenia Costa-Giomi, "The McGill Piano Project: Effects of three years of piano instruction on children's cognitive abilities, academic achievement, and self-esteem," presented at the meeting of the Music Educators National Conference, Phoenix, AZ, April, 1998

Did You Know?

Data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988 showed that music participants received more academic honors and awards than non-music students, and that the percentage of music participants receiving As, As/Bs, and Bs was higher than the percentage of non-participants receiving those grades.

Source: National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988 First Follow-Up (1990), U.S. Department of Education.

Did You Know?

Research shows that piano students are better equipped to comprehend mathematical and scientific concepts. A group of preschoolers received private piano keyboard lessons and singing lessons. A second group received private computer lessons. Those children who received piano/keyboard training performed 34 percent higher on tests measuring spatial-temporal ability than the others ‹ even those who received computer training. "Spatial-temporal" is basically proportional reasoning - ratios, fractions, proportions and thinking in space and time. This concept has long been considered a major obstacle in the teaching of elementary math and science.

Source: Neurological Research February 28, 1997

Did You Know?

Young children with developed rhythm skills perform better academically in early school years. Findings of a recent study showed that there was a significant difference in the academic achievement levels of students classified according to rhythmic competency. Students who were achieving at academic expectation scored high on all rhythmic tasks, while many of those who scored lower on the rhythmic test achieved below academic expectation.

Source: "The Relationship between Rhythmic Competency and Academic Performance in First Grade Children," University of Central Florida, Debby Mitchell

Did You Know?

High school music students score higher on SATs in both verbal and math than their peers. In 2001, SAT takers with coursework/experience in music performance scored 57 points higher on the verbal portion of the test and 41 points higher on the math portion than students with no coursework/experience in the arts.

Source: Profile of SAT and Achievement Test Takers, The College Board, compiled by Music Educators National Conference, 2001.

Did You Know?

College-age musicians are emotionally healthier than their non-musician counterparts. A study conducted at the University of Texas looked at 362 students who were in their first semester of college. They were given three tests, measuring performance anxiety, emotional concerns and alcohol related problems. In addition to having fewer battles with the bottle, researchers also noted that the college-aged music students seemed to have surer footing when facing tests.

Source: Houston Chronicle, January 11, 1998

Did You Know?

A ten-year study, tracking more than 25,000 students, shows that music-making improves test scores. Regardless of socioeconomic background, music-making students get higher marks in standardized tests than those who had no music involvement. The test scores studied were not only standardized tests, such as the SAT, but also in reading proficiency exams.

Source: Dr. James Catterall, UCLA, 1997

Did You Know?

The world's top academic countries place a high value on music education. Hungary, Netherlands and Japan stand atop worldwide science achievement and have strong commitment to music education. All three countries have required music training at the elementary and middle school levels, both instrumental and vocal, for several decades. The centrality of music education to learning in the top-ranked countries seems to contradict the United States' focus on math, science, vocabulary, and technology.

Source: 1988 International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IAEEA) Test

Did You Know?

Music training helps under-achievers. In Rhode Island, researchers studied eight public school first grade classes. Half of the classes became "test arts" groups, receiving ongoing music and visual arts training. In kindergarten, this group had lagged behind in scholastic performance. After seven months, the students were given a standardized test. The "test arts" group had caught up to their fellow students in reading and surpassed their classmates in math by 22 percent. In the second year of the project, the arts students widened this margin even further. Students were also evaluated on attitude and behavior. Classroom teachers noted improvement in these areas also.

Source: Nature May 23, 1996

Did You Know?

"Music education can be a positive force on all aspects of a child's life, particularly on their academic success. The study of music by children has been linked to higher scores on the SAT and other learning aptitude tests, and has proven to be an invaluable tool in classrooms across the country. Given the impact music can have on our children's education, we should support every effort to bring music into their classrooms."

Source: U.S. Senator Jeff Bingaman (NM)

Did You Know?

"The nation's top business executives agree that arts education programs can help repair weaknesses in American education and better prepare workers for the 21st century."

Source: "The Changing Workplace is Changing Our View of Education," Business Week, October 1996.
Excellent reasons why the school district needs to continue funding arts programs and expand them. ***If*** the city could shift those dollars to the district for arts funding it would be great! But alas, that's not the way things work. Instead the district spends $$$ on sports facilities and admin buildings.

How much $$$ do they spend on convocation at the beginning of the school year? Why do teachers need a big RAH RAH kick-off event? Those dollars alone could expand arts programs and be put to better use INSIDE THE CLASSROOM supporting teachers instead of getting them pumped up for one day.

Still not a reason to spend millions in a private/public arts center of this size...not even in Frisco.
 

GoodAg

Double Platinum
#33
I shouldn't say this. I know I shouldn't say this, but...

Those people that are saying this needs to be built because the arts make you smarter, etc. really should spell-check their work. Just sayin...
 

GoodAg

Double Platinum
#34
And for clarification purposes, I have yet to meet anyone who is opposed to developing the arts here in Frisco. What I have seen is people who are opposed to developing a venue that before it has even been built is showing financial loss well into the future and is supported by the "you-show-me-your-money-first-then-I'll-show-you-mine" private donors.
 

aggieteach

Double Platinum
#35
I don't personally know Dr. Trent, nor had I seen this email. But after reading it it sounds lije he was giving his opinion to his teachers and asked them to encoraget parents to vote (but not tell patents how to vote). It does not look like to me he intended the email to be forwarded. I think the teacher that forwarded the email did not read it and just forwarded it.
 

bizguy

Diamond Member
#36
Make sure to take note of the part about higher test scores particularly on the SAT...you want facts here you go, cited even.

http://www.nammfoundation.org/research/research-briefs-did-you-know

Did You Know?

yada, yada, yada
Blah, blah.. half the sources you site are worthless opinions with no facts - US Senator? Houston Chronicle? Really?

The other half are from "studies" done by those that have a vested interest in the continued funding of music education through tax dollars. As usual these social "scientists" confuse correlation with causation. There are studies that show the vast majority of those involved in auto accidents have eaten carrots in the last year. Maybe correlated, but definitely not the cause.

I believe music and athletics are important for kids, but that is not the purpose of school.

Edited to remove all the overly long quote...
 
Last edited:

TPW

Diamond Member
#38
Excellent reasons why the school district needs to continue funding arts programs and expand them. ***If*** the city could shift those dollars to the district for arts funding it would be great! But alas, that's not the way things work. Instead the district spends $$$ on sports facilities and admin buildings.

How much $$$ do they spend on convocation at the beginning of the school year? Why do teachers need a big RAH RAH kick-off event? Those dollars alone could expand arts programs and be put to better use INSIDE THE CLASSROOM supporting teachers instead of getting them pumped up for one day.

Still not a reason to spend millions in a private/public arts center of this size...not even in Frisco.
My post was meant to counter Bizguy and his statement that arts education shouldn't be in the school system.

I myself support the ACC becuase I would like to see something in the area besides strip malls, houses and minor league sports venues. I don't disagree that pushing the ACC as an educational venue is wrong headed even if it would be beneficial which it would.

The fact is if we are going to spend $16 million and don't kid yourself that the money isn't going to get spent. I'd prefer to see it spent on the ACC. You don't have to agree but that is how I feel and how I voted.
 

SixDegrees

Diamond Member
#39
Since the ISD board encouraged the PTA president's to send letters to their congressman concerning the school budget issue and encouraged them to reach out to the membership to do likewise I don't see this as too big of an issue.
Of course not - you're for the ACC so you have no issue of him using ISD resources and during ISD hours to push for their and your agenda as well as taking advantage of parent email lists which are you be used strictly for "ISD related" mailings only - not political campaigns. You complain about the federal government using taxpayers money to promote their agenda all the time. So what is it? Can obama now start hiring taxpayer paid employees to start pushing is reelection because you decided hes a nice guy and cares about the citizen? And yes I know Dr Trent as well from having two kids in band. He is a great guy and he does care about the kids - but this lacks integrity and abuse of taxpayer funds and trust and you know it. It doesn't matter how small an issue it appears to you.
 

Piiilot

Platinum Member
#40
Make sure to take note of the part about higher test scores particularly on the SAT...you want facts here you go, cited even.

http://www.nammfoundation.org/research/research-briefs-did-you-know

Did You Know?

Middle school and high school students who participated in instrumental music scored significantly higher than their non-band peers in standardized tests. University studies conducted in Georgia and Texas found significant correlations between the number of years of instrumental music instruction and academic achievement in math, science and language arts.

Source: University of Sarasota Study, Jeffrey Lynn Kluball; East Texas State University Study, Daryl Erick Trent

Did You Know?

Students who were exposed to the music-based lessons scored a full 100 percent higher on fractions tests than those who learned in the conventional manner. Second-grade and third-grade students were taught fractions in an untraditional manner ‹ by teaching them basic music rhythm notation. The group was taught about the relationships between eighth, quarter, half and whole notes. Their peers received traditional fraction instruction.

Source: Neurological Research, March 15, 1999

Did You Know?

Music majors are the most likely group of college grads to be admitted to medical school. Physician and biologist Lewis Thomas studied the undergraduate majors of medical school applicants. He found that 66 percent of music majors who applied to med school were admitted, the highest percentage of any group. For comparison, (44 percent) of biochemistry majors were admitted. Also, a study of 7,500 university students revealed that music majors scored the highest reading scores among all majors including English, biology, chemistry and math.

Sources: "The Comparative Academic Abilities of Students in Education and in Other Areas of a Multi-focus University," Peter H. Wood, ERIC Document No. ED327480

"The Case for Music in the Schools," Phi Delta Kappan, February, 1994

Did You Know?

Music study can help kids understand advanced music concepts. A grasp of proportional math and fractions is a prerequisite to math at higher levels, and children who do not master these areas cannot understand more advanced math critical to high-tech fields. Music involves ratios, fractions, proportions and thinking in space and time. Second-grade students were given four months of piano keyboard training, as well as time using newly designed math software. The group scored over 27 percent higher on proportional math and fractions tests than children who used only the math software.

Source: Neurological Research March, 1999

Did You Know?

A McGill University study found that pattern recognition and mental representation scores improved significantly for students given piano instruction over a three-year period. They also found that self-esteem and musical skills measures improved for the students given piano instruction.

Source: Dr. Eugenia Costa-Giomi, "The McGill Piano Project: Effects of three years of piano instruction on children's cognitive abilities, academic achievement, and self-esteem," presented at the meeting of the Music Educators National Conference, Phoenix, AZ, April, 1998

Did You Know?

Data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988 showed that music participants received more academic honors and awards than non-music students, and that the percentage of music participants receiving As, As/Bs, and Bs was higher than the percentage of non-participants receiving those grades.

Source: National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988 First Follow-Up (1990), U.S. Department of Education.

Did You Know?

Research shows that piano students are better equipped to comprehend mathematical and scientific concepts. A group of preschoolers received private piano keyboard lessons and singing lessons. A second group received private computer lessons. Those children who received piano/keyboard training performed 34 percent higher on tests measuring spatial-temporal ability than the others ‹ even those who received computer training. "Spatial-temporal" is basically proportional reasoning - ratios, fractions, proportions and thinking in space and time. This concept has long been considered a major obstacle in the teaching of elementary math and science.

Source: Neurological Research February 28, 1997

Did You Know?

Young children with developed rhythm skills perform better academically in early school years. Findings of a recent study showed that there was a significant difference in the academic achievement levels of students classified according to rhythmic competency. Students who were achieving at academic expectation scored high on all rhythmic tasks, while many of those who scored lower on the rhythmic test achieved below academic expectation.

Source: "The Relationship between Rhythmic Competency and Academic Performance in First Grade Children," University of Central Florida, Debby Mitchell

Did You Know?

High school music students score higher on SATs in both verbal and math than their peers. In 2001, SAT takers with coursework/experience in music performance scored 57 points higher on the verbal portion of the test and 41 points higher on the math portion than students with no coursework/experience in the arts.

Source: Profile of SAT and Achievement Test Takers, The College Board, compiled by Music Educators National Conference, 2001.

Did You Know?

College-age musicians are emotionally healthier than their non-musician counterparts. A study conducted at the University of Texas looked at 362 students who were in their first semester of college. They were given three tests, measuring performance anxiety, emotional concerns and alcohol related problems. In addition to having fewer battles with the bottle, researchers also noted that the college-aged music students seemed to have surer footing when facing tests.

Source: Houston Chronicle, January 11, 1998

Did You Know?

A ten-year study, tracking more than 25,000 students, shows that music-making improves test scores. Regardless of socioeconomic background, music-making students get higher marks in standardized tests than those who had no music involvement. The test scores studied were not only standardized tests, such as the SAT, but also in reading proficiency exams.

Source: Dr. James Catterall, UCLA, 1997

Did You Know?

The world's top academic countries place a high value on music education. Hungary, Netherlands and Japan stand atop worldwide science achievement and have strong commitment to music education. All three countries have required music training at the elementary and middle school levels, both instrumental and vocal, for several decades. The centrality of music education to learning in the top-ranked countries seems to contradict the United States' focus on math, science, vocabulary, and technology.

Source: 1988 International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IAEEA) Test

Did You Know?

Music training helps under-achievers. In Rhode Island, researchers studied eight public school first grade classes. Half of the classes became "test arts" groups, receiving ongoing music and visual arts training. In kindergarten, this group had lagged behind in scholastic performance. After seven months, the students were given a standardized test. The "test arts" group had caught up to their fellow students in reading and surpassed their classmates in math by 22 percent. In the second year of the project, the arts students widened this margin even further. Students were also evaluated on attitude and behavior. Classroom teachers noted improvement in these areas also.

Source: Nature May 23, 1996

Did You Know?

"Music education can be a positive force on all aspects of a child's life, particularly on their academic success. The study of music by children has been linked to higher scores on the SAT and other learning aptitude tests, and has proven to be an invaluable tool in classrooms across the country. Given the impact music can have on our children's education, we should support every effort to bring music into their classrooms."

Source: U.S. Senator Jeff Bingaman (NM)

Did You Know?

"The nation's top business executives agree that arts education programs can help repair weaknesses in American education and better prepare workers for the 21st century."

Source: "The Changing Workplace is Changing Our View of Education," Business Week, October 1996.
Did you know ?Some of the research you are citing is almost 20 years old ? Go find some research that was from this century or this decade. Education has changed a lot since 1990. Most of the students in our schools were not even born when this research was done.
You have taken all of the credibility our of your argument by throwing out info this old.